Conversations about Car Brands

Monday, 29 November 2010 by

This is the final in a series of posts sharing Keller Fay TalkTrack® analysis on word of mouth in the automotive industry.  The information shared below is from a comprehensive two-year study of nearly 100,000 brand-related conversations Americans have had offline and online about cars. We’ve covered lots of territory in the past month sharing word of mouth insights into the Automotive industry.  First, we learned the more talkable a brand is, the greater its market share.  Next, we learned 35% of Americans have at least one brand-related conversation about cars every day.  And, we learned how the recent automobile industry crisis impacted people’s conversations about cars. Today, we’re sharing quick hit insights about specific car brands from a recent Keller Fay TalkTrack® report. Ford is the most talked about

This is the third in a series of posts sharing Keller Fay TalkTrack® analysis on word of mouth in the automotive industry.  The information shared below is from a comprehensive two-year Keller Fay study of nearly 100,000 brand-related conversations Americans have had offline and online about cars. The headlines beginning in 2008 were disastrous for the automobile industry.  Sales of new cars in America plummeted 31.9% in October 2008 compared to the same month in 2007.  In January 2009, the US Government loaned $24.9 billion to America’s biggest car companies.  Chrysler filed for bankruptcy in April 2009.  General Motors filed for bankruptcy in June 2009.  And in January 2010, Toyota recalled 2.3 million cars to repair malfunctioning gas pedals. Keller Fay, through its ongoing TalkTrack® study, has been measuring and

This is the second in a series of posts sharing Keller Fay TalkTrack® analysis on word of mouth in the automotive industry.  The information shared below is from a comprehensive two-year study of nearly 100,000 brand-related conversations Americans have had offline and online about cars. Did you know . . . 35% of Americans have at least one brand-related conversation about cars every day. Of course you did, you read the first post in this series.  Seriously, according to Keller Fay research, Americans have over 42 BILLION conversations about the automotive industry every year. Did you know . . . almost 50% of all conversations Americans have about the automotive category involve four specific brands:  Ford, Chevrolet, Toyota, and Honda. There is definitely a long tail distribution effect with these

Keller Fay Car Talk

Tuesday, 09 November 2010 by

The beleaguered automotive industry is revving up its sales engine.  Chrysler, Ford, Honda, and Nissan have all recently reported year-over-year sales increases of more than 15%.  That’s remarkable news given the still sluggish U.S. economy. There’s much to talk about with the automotive industry from these strong sales figures to the still top-of-mind government bailout of the industry to the introduction of innovative hybrid cars to fallout from Toyota’s quality concerns stemming from recent recalls. Keller Fay recently pulled together a comprehensive analysis of nearly 100,000 word-of-mouth (WOM) offline as well as online conversations Americans have had from September 2008 through August 2010.  This two-year study covers the auto industry crisis and Keller Fay’s findings detail the polarity of brand-specific conversations as well as the credibility differences between WOM about

Fortune November 5, 2010 by Alex Taylor III Subaru, which makes a habit of beating expectations, has done it again. For October, Subaru saw its sales jump 25% in a month where auto sales as a whole rose only 13%.  In the year to date, its sales are up 23% vs. the industry’s 11%.  With two months still to go, Subaru has already beaten its own yearly sales record. Subaru doesn’t grow by selling the deal instead of the car.  According to Edmunds.com, its incentives in October were the second-lowest in the industry at $474 per car, representing 1.8% of the sticker price. After more than two years of outperformance, Subaru is no longer autodom’s best-kept secret. Indeed, a to-be released study of word-of-mouth referrals by nearly 100,000 people, conducted

What should an advertiser do when its industry is being ravaged in the news media amid a crisis of historic proportions?  Go quiet until the trouble passes, or continue to engage directly with paid messaging?  The recent crisis faced by the financial and automotive industries provides two excellent cases in point, with lessons for marketers in all categories.This week, at the Advertising Research Foundation’s Annual ReThink Conference, my colleague Brad Fay joined with Mediavest’s David Shiffman to address this topic.  Their paper is based on more than two years of continuous research that spanned the periods before, during, and since the height of the economic crises facing the financial services and automotive industries. The paper links word of mouth about brands in these two industries with a 360 degree perspective

The New York Times For those wondering why Toyota Motor continues to advertise during the current crisis over its reputation, a coming study suggests that such a course of action could be superior to inaction. The study, “Advertising Amid Crisis,” is scheduled to be presented on Wednesday, during a session of the 56th annual convention of the Advertising Research Foundation.  It is to be presented by Brad Fay, chief operating office at the Keller Fay Group, which specializes in research on word of mouth and “buzz,” and David Shiffman, senior vice president at MediaVest, a media agency that is part of the Publicis Groupe. The study looked at the effects of the coverage of the financial crisis on marketers in two hard-hit categories, automobiles and financial services.  The study analyzed

Car Talk and the Value of Advertising

Wednesday, 28 October 2009 by

The tumultuous year for the auto industry has Americans buzzing.  Word of mouth about auto brands spiked a dramatic 10% from the beginning of the year to now – fueled first by the economic downturn which led to steep declines in auto sales, followed by news stories of bankruptcies and bailouts, and then a heavy dose of advertising touting Cash for Clunkers and new models. Yet despite the summer burst of Cash for Clunkers advertising, the industry spent less on advertising in 2009 than it has in a decade, representing a $1.6 billion plunge from the prior year, according to Nielsen.  The sharp cutback, particularly by GM and Chrysler, provides an interesting opportunity to assess how advertising – or the lack thereof – affects brand perceptions and buzz. Let’s start

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