Media Planning for Word of Mouth

Wednesday, 18 July 2012 by

By Ed Keller July 13, 2012 One of the key themes of this blog and my recent book is that the opportunities for business to engage in social marketing extend far beyond online social media such as Facebook or Twitter.  Media and marketing of all types drive word of mouth conversation – for example, what people see on television is as likely to drive conversation as what they see on the internet.   Further, a very large amount of word of mouth is driven by advertising. It is for this reason that I have argued previously that “all media are social.”  But to fully capitalize on the fact that people frequently talk about the advertising they see and hear requires more than just serendipity.  Media should be planned with word of

Posted on Kirkus Review By Clayton Moore Social media is not king, according to the head honchos of the Keller Fay Group, the groundbreaking marketing and research consultancy devoted not to the Twitterverse but to good old-fashioned word of mouth. In their new book, CEO Ed Keller (The Influentials, 2003) and COO Brad Fay delve deep into the fallacies behind the “Social Media Gold Rush,” and give great thought to the media strategies that really work best for business and not just buzz. Here, Keller answered a few of our questions about The Face-to-Face Book, which he co-authored with Fay. Brush up on business practices with billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad’s ‘The Art of Being Unreasonable.‘ It is interesting that you refer to “word on the street.” We agree that’s what matters most, more

By Ed Keller June 28, 2012 Everyone is talking about the massive amount of money that will be spent on advertising during this presidential election.   But a recent article in the New York Times illustrates that advertising alone will not win the campaign, and that organized, person-to-person persuasion remains critically important. Entitled, “Obama Campaign Banks On High-Tech Ground Game to Reach Voters,” the article explains how “a cadre of volunteers has been formed to ‘break through the clutter’ of an expected wave of negative television ads from Romney supporters.”  In other words, in an attempt to neutralize what it believes will be a Romney advantage in terms of television advertising, the Obama campaign is investing heavily in “the ground game” whereby local supporters will be mobilized to talk to undecided

By Ed Keller June is a very active time for sports television:  the NBA Playoffs are in full throttle along with the Stanley Cup, MLB races are taking shape, the US Open Golf tournament is soon upon us with Tiger Woods once again relevant, and two of Tennis’s major tournaments (The French Open and Wimbledon) will take place this month.  And by the end of next month it will be on to the London 2012 Olympics. Major sports events are particularly popular for out-of-home viewing, whether at bars and restaurants, friends’ homes, in offices, or “on the go” via mobile devices. There are two important questions for advertisers, however:  How big are out-of-home audiences, and are they more or less valuable than at-home audiences?  The argument for being less valuable

By Ed Keller The run up to Facebook’s IPO was abuzz with optimism about just how large and successful it would be.  The first few days following the IPO have been awash with stories of doom and gloom, a failed IPO, and lawsuits.  It’s now time for some perspective – not from an investor’s point of view, but from the point of view of social marketing. There is no question that there is a hugely important social wave rolling across the world of business and marketing today.  Every survey that is taken shows that more than any other source, people trust the advice and recommendations they get from other people – family, friends, colleagues at work, and sometimes even strangers they meet in stores – or reviews they read online.

By Ed Keller On May 22, Brad Fay’s and my new book, THE FACE-TO-FACE BOOK:  Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace, will be published.   You can download a free excerpt from the book here or buy it online here. As part of our research we looked at the history of word of mouth and social influence, and were reminded that the past is indeed prologue.  My first blog on this topic, reviewed the seminal work of Columbia Professors Paul Lazarsfeld and Elihu Katz – Personal Influence. Part two discussed the origins of word-of-mouth advertising in the 1960s and its relevance to today. In this third and final look back I turn to the Cluetrain Manifesto published in 1999. We live in the social media age of Facebook, Twitter,

By Ed Keller On May 22, Brad Fay’s and my new book, THE FACE-TO-FACE BOOK:  Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace, will be published.   You can download a free excerpt from the book here or find it online here. As part of our research we looked at the history of word of mouth and social influence, and were reminded that the past is indeed prologue.  My first blog on this topic, reviewed the seminal work of Columbia Professors Paul Lazarsfeld and Elihu Katz – Personal Influence .  Here I discuss the origins of word of mouth advertising and its relevance to today. The Advent of Word-of-Mouth Advertising As far as we have been able to determine, the phrase “Word-of-Mouth Advertising” was coined by Ernest Dichter who, in 1966,

By Ed Keller On May 22, my new book, The Face-to-Face Book:  Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace will be published.   Coauthored by Brad Fay, it is a book about the hugely important social wave that is rolling across the world of business today.  But unlike many books and articles argue that online social networks are creating this social wave, we argue that the largest and most important part of social influence is that which happens when conversations happen in the real world, face to face.  There is a vast array of tools and approaches that can be tapped by marketers to drive these real world conversations. You can download a free excerpt from the book here. While researching the book, I reviewed the history of word of

By Steve Thomson, Managing Director, Keller Fay UK UK consumers are talking more and more with their friends and relatives about the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympic games, but the rise in buzz about the games is very gradual.  To date, football remains a much bigger talking point, particularly among men and many traditional sport fans.  Buzz is also much weaker outside of London and the South-East. These are the findings of the latest consumer research on word of mouth by the Keller Fay Group.  They are based on new, just released information from Keller Fay’s TalkTrack Britain® study, an ongoing research programme which tracks word of mouth in the UK on a continuous basis.  It is the only such research that looks at both offline as well as online

Conversations vs. Connections

Thursday, 26 April 2012 by

By Ed Keller MIT Professor Sherry Turkle wrote a powerful opinion piece in this past Sunday’s New York Times Sunday Review in which she draws a sharp distinction between conversations that take place face-to-face, in the real world, and connections that get made online through social networking sites. “We are tempted to think that our little ‘sips’ of online connections add up to a big gulp of real conversation,” she writes.  “But they don’t.  E-mail, Twitter, Facebook, all have their places – in politics, commerce, romance and friendship.  But no matter how valuable, they do not substitute for conversation.” Texting, emailing and online posting, she says, allow us “to present the self we want to be.  This means we can edit.  And if we wish, we can delete. Or retouch: 

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