By Ed Keller The relationship between social media and TV is of considerable interest to media owners, agencies, and brands.  Twitter is investing heavily to buy social media monitoring companies, and Facebook too is seeking to bolster its claim on social engagement with TV.  There’s no doubt that ‘Social TV’ has become the subject of much speculation. But just how significant is the television viewer’s engagement with social media while they are watching prime time TV?   Are certain demographic groups more engaged socially than others when it comes to TV, and are they the ones we generally associated with social media?  What about genres – which capture the greatest degree of social engagement?  These and other questions are answered by a major new study that was recently released study by

by Ed Keller Keller Fay and other commentators have noted the link between emotion and brand word of mouth (WOM) on a number of occasions.  In particular, a major academic study (On Brands and Word of Mouth) notes that emotion is a key trigger of brand buzz: “the motive to share positive or negative feelings about brands in order to express these emotions or balance emotional arousal.”  A similar point is made by Wharton professor Jonah Berger in his bestselling book Contagious:  Why Things Catch On, noting that emotion is one of the major ingredients that causes things to be talked about or shared: “When we care, we share.” Some emotion-driven buzz is a reaction to a brand experience or event – a great product or service experience, an ad,

By VINDU GOEL  April 10, 2014, 7:00 AM on the New York Times Social Blog at: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/10/twitter-and-facebook-wield-little-influence-on-tv-watching/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&src=busln&_r=1& Listen to executives at Twitter and Facebook talk about how we watch television and you might walk away thinking that Americans are chattering nonstop on the social networks while watching their favorite shows. The reality is that most of us don’t tweet or post at all while we’re plopped in front of the tube. When we do, half the time we’re talking about something other than TV. And social media conversation is far weaker than traditional factors, like TV commercials for new shows or our sheer laziness in changing channels, in prompting us to tune into each season’s new offerings. Those are among the crucial findings of a new study released Thursday by the Council for Research

WHAT: An Amazing Brand Marketing Presentation & Breakfast for Executives WHEN:  APRIL 23, 8 AM – 10:30 AM WHERE:  The Weber Grill (RSVP Below for Directions) RSVP: Email ERICA SHOTLAND of The Keller Fay Group (eshotland@kellerfay.com) Join us for the most important meal of the day to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships. Industry pioneers You’ll hear from two thought leaders in the new social marketing revolution, Brad Fay, COO of The Keller Fay Group, and Peter Storck, SVP/Research of House Party. Dissecting influential conversations They’ll discuss how and why more than 90% of influential conversations are still taking place offline, even in this hyper-digital age. They will also explain how the deeper engagement of an in-person experience leads to more persuasive advocacy, wider reach and bigger

New study finds that broadcast content is the dominant television resource for local political information.  More than half of all respondents (61%) source their local political conversations from something they saw or heard on local news programming alone. Furthermore, broadcast television websites accounted for 4 of the top 5 online influencers, outpacing social media sources by a ratio of 3:1. In fact, if you’re relying on social media to monitor “the local political conversation”, you’re only capturing about 4% of the electorate’s sentiment. To determine the currency value of local news, TVB (the not-for-profit trade association of America’s commercial broadcast television industry) worked with The Keller Fay Group, a full service marketing research and consulting company dedicated exclusively to word-of-mouth marketing. Television has always been a mass medium, allowing candidates to

Contrary to popular belief, social media isn’t the only way to communicate with the masses. Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group LLC, explains why good, old-fashioned face-to-face communication is still king when it comes to marketing. By Lena Valenty Given the sheer number of people on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter (the sites boast 1.2 billion, 230 million, and 259 million users, respectively), it’s easy for marketers to fall into the trap that social media is a silver bullet for mass communication. After all, it generates 25 billion brand impressions each year. But there’s another marketing medium with a far greater reach and a more impressive track record: real-life conversations. According to Ed Keller, co-author of “The Face-to-Face Book: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace,” in-person communication

A major new study also find that half of all social media activity while watching TV relates to TV, according to Council for Research Excellence By George Winslow March 24, 2014 on B&C website at: http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/technology/research-tv-promos-still-more-effective-social-media/129992 A new study into the relationship of social media and television finds that social media is an increasingly important component of TV viewing, with about one in six viewers using social media during primetime and that half of that social media usage was related to TV, according to a new study from the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). But the study also found that traditional TV promos remain more effective than social media and that promos and commercials were the number one drive of the decision to view new shows. Nearly two in five viewers

by Ed Keller Samsung was the sponsor behind Ellen DeGeneres’s headline grabbing, record breaking, Twitter busting “selfie” at the Oscars.  For Samsung, it was part of a much larger, longer-term march to become one of the most talked about brands in America. For quite a number of years running, Coke was the most talked about brand in America. Beginning in 2010 Apple started a sharp ascendancy and by Q4 of 2012 it had overtaken Coke. Samsung’s WOM is rising rapidly, as well, breaking into the top 10 in 2012 and into the top 5 in 2013. Samsung’s WOM not only grew sharply during the past two years, but especially during the all-important holiday shopping season.  Samsung’s WOM increased by 150 million word of mouth impressions during the 2013 holidays versus

By Ed Keller Everyone, it seems, has heard that people are far more likely to share their bad brand experiences than positive ones.  Probe further about whether they have actually seen evidence of that, and the answer is generally, “no, but I’ve heard it’s true.” Well, the fact is, it’s not true.  Positive WOM is far more prevalent than negative WOM, and has a greater impact.  For brands, there is far more to be gained than feared by being part of organic consumer conversation. To start, more than two-thirds of all brand-related WOM is generally positive in nature, while less than 10% is generally negative.  That’s over eight times more positive than negative WOM.  And what’s more, positive WOM is even more prevalent in key product categories, topping out at

LONDON, March 6, 2014 /PRNewswire – Data from marketing research group Keller Fay’s TalkTrack® programme indicates that negative word of mouth (WOM) for telecom companies providing phone, TV and broadband services in Britain is higher than for most other sectors. Every day in the UK, an estimated 3 million negative opinions are exchanged about one or other of five major providers – BT, Sky, Virgin Media, TalkTalk or Plusnet TalkTalk attracted 29% negative WOM, a figure which is almost three times the UK all-category average (10%). The performance of BT is not much better, receiving negative press in over a quarter of discussions. Plusnet is the best of the providers, recording the lowest criticism and achieving the highest level of positive sentiment (58%) – although even this fails to impress when it is compared to the UK all-category average of 62%. Plusnet’s

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