Next Wednesday, Feb. 19th, Brad Fay, COO of the Keller Fay Group, and Peter Storck, SVP of Research at House Party Inc.  will be among a panel at Social Media Week NYC addressing the question of return on investment of social marketing – both online and offline.  It’s a burning question for most marketers today:  Can you really measure the ROI of “social,” online and off? And if so, how?  In this informative session a panel of thought-leaders in social marketing measurement will provide the answers needed to measure and justify the social in marketing plans. And they’ll share about a major Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) initiative to measure the ROI of social, relative to other media. Brad Fay will discuss how brands can track their share of

by Ed Keller The Seattle Seahawk’s vaunted “12th man” and the crowd noise they generate make their home field the loudest of any stadium in the NFL.  That sound is beginning to reverberate across the nation, as the Seahawks moved up 11 places in terms of their NFL Word of Mouth ranking among the 32 teams. Nevertheless, the Denver Broncos have had a clear word of mouth lead over the Seahawks, nationwide, over the course of this football season. These are the season-to-date statistics about word of mouth for the NFL, according to the Keller Fay Group, a word of mouth marketing research company that provides ongoing word of mouth tracking including both offline conversations as well as online chatter. Denver jumped into the ranks of top 5 most talked NFL

As Keller Fay COO Brad Fay assumed the role of Chairman of Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) for 2014, he wrote this piece about WOMMA’s Tenth Anniversary for WOMMA’s All Things WOMM blog and we are reprinting it: Ten years ago, in 2004, Facebook was still a Harvard student experiment known as “thefacebook.” The founding of Twitter was still two years away. But three innovative entrepreneurs knew that consumer marketing was about to experience a gigantic change. They foresaw the rapid rise of peer-to-peer consumer influence, online sharing and a two-way communications dialog between brands and their customers. Those prescient men were David Balter, CEO and founder of BzzAgent; Pete Blacksaw, then CMO of Intelliseek; and Jonathan Carson, then CEO of Buzzmetrics which later acquired Intelliseek and was acquired

by Ed Keller Each December, CBS’s Chief Research Officer Dave Poltrack addresses the UBS Annual Global Media and Communications Conference.  This year’s talk, “The Outlook for the Broadcast Networks,” covered a wide range of topics, including social TV:  “Nothing was hotter this year than social media with Twitter front and center with its IPO,” according to Poltrack.  “Television programs and televised events have always been a major source of conversation. With the emergence of the online social media we are seeing how much these subjects dominate people’s non-personal interaction.” Then, in what might have been a surprise to the investors in the audience, Poltrack made this strong statement:  “However, the real action is not online, it is still face-to-face.”  And the correlation statistics he shared bear this out. To begin,

Word of Mouth’s Measurement Imperative

Thursday, 05 December 2013 by

Word of mouth is more effective than traditional marketing, but difficulty proving ROI is a significant obstacle to growth. Those are two of the most significant findings to emerge from the recently released “State of Word of Mouth Marketing Survey,” conducted by the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) and the American Marketing Association (AMA). According to the study, two thirds of marketing professionals feel that word of mouth marketing is more effective than “traditional” marketing.  Reflecting this belief, 70% of marketers expect their companies will spend more money on social media in 2014, representing a bigger increase than any of 10 forms of marketing that were studied. Standing in the way of bigger investment in word of mouth and social media marketing, however, are difficulty measuring offline WOM (89%),

How well does WOM about TV shows align with ratings?  The latest tracking from Keller Fay for Ad Age says, “Quite well.”  People talked the most about the shows they watched the most … for the most part.  So what do you think?  Does water cooler talk predict the hit series?  See the results and story on Ad Age: http://bit.ly/Hw5dL2

Mediapost’s Marketing Daily Commentary by Ed Keller, October 22, 2013 – Location, Location, Location – brands in pursuit of all-important consumer word of mouth and advocacy cannot afford to ignore it, same as channels or demographics. Read Ed Keller’s take in MediaPost on what goes into marketer’s ‘secret sauce’.  Based upon a new research study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities”. Read more at Mediapost.com: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/210949/for-word-of-mouth-the-secret-sauce-lies-in-the-so.html?edition=66019#ixzz2iW6oVQ9W

Keller Fay Group Study Reveals Top 10 Ranking, Highlighting Opportunities for Brand Marketers to Drive Recommendations, Especially “Down South” Houston More Likely to Talk About Automotive (+37%), Jacksonville – Finance (+56%), Miami – Travel (+75%) New Brunswick, NJ – October 21, 2013 – Are certain U.S. cities more “talkative” about brands than others? A new study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities,” released by leading word-of-mouth research company, The Keller Fay Group, reveals that residents of Houston, TX have an average of 95 consumer conversations per person per week, more than the residents of any other major city in the United States. As marketers are increasingly recognizing the significant role that word of mouth (WOM) plays in driving business outcomes such as sales, results suggest that certain cities are more WOM-focused than

For the third week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows and listening in on “real world” conversations — not just what you see on Twitter and Facebook. We worked with the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking word-of-mouth, to generate the chart you see here. (Last week’s chart is right over here.) The data is based on interviews with a cross-section of 1,452 Americans ages 13 to 69 years old who were interviewed from Oct. 7 to Oct. 13 regarding 29 new, high-profile TV shows that have premiered already or will premiere shortly. Because the fall TV premiere schedule stretches on for weeks and weeks through September and October, Keller Fay is conducting

For the second week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows. You’re used to seeing data about conversations happening in social media, but what about offline conversations? Enter the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking “real world” word-of-mouth conversations. Ad Age worked with Keller Fay to generate the following chart of the top ten most talked about new tv shows. Real world popularity trends are unfolding as the season gets underway: Read the Keller Fay analysis on AdAge ..

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