Contrary to popular belief, social media isn’t the only way to communicate with the masses. Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group LLC, explains why good, old-fashioned face-to-face communication is still king when it comes to marketing. By Lena Valenty Given the sheer number of people on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter (the sites boast 1.2 billion, 230 million, and 259 million users, respectively), it’s easy for marketers to fall into the trap that social media is a silver bullet for mass communication. After all, it generates 25 billion brand impressions each year. But there’s another marketing medium with a far greater reach and a more impressive track record: real-life conversations. According to Ed Keller, co-author of “The Face-to-Face Book: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace,” in-person communication

A major new study also find that half of all social media activity while watching TV relates to TV, according to Council for Research Excellence By George Winslow March 24, 2014 on B&C website at: http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/technology/research-tv-promos-still-more-effective-social-media/129992 A new study into the relationship of social media and television finds that social media is an increasingly important component of TV viewing, with about one in six viewers using social media during primetime and that half of that social media usage was related to TV, according to a new study from the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). But the study also found that traditional TV promos remain more effective than social media and that promos and commercials were the number one drive of the decision to view new shows. Nearly two in five viewers

by Ed Keller Samsung was the sponsor behind Ellen DeGeneres’s headline grabbing, record breaking, Twitter busting “selfie” at the Oscars.  For Samsung, it was part of a much larger, longer-term march to become one of the most talked about brands in America. For quite a number of years running, Coke was the most talked about brand in America. Beginning in 2010 Apple started a sharp ascendancy and by Q4 of 2012 it had overtaken Coke. Samsung’s WOM is rising rapidly, as well, breaking into the top 10 in 2012 and into the top 5 in 2013. Samsung’s WOM not only grew sharply during the past two years, but especially during the all-important holiday shopping season.  Samsung’s WOM increased by 150 million word of mouth impressions during the 2013 holidays versus

By Ed Keller Everyone, it seems, has heard that people are far more likely to share their bad brand experiences than positive ones.  Probe further about whether they have actually seen evidence of that, and the answer is generally, “no, but I’ve heard it’s true.” Well, the fact is, it’s not true.  Positive WOM is far more prevalent than negative WOM, and has a greater impact.  For brands, there is far more to be gained than feared by being part of organic consumer conversation. To start, more than two-thirds of all brand-related WOM is generally positive in nature, while less than 10% is generally negative.  That’s over eight times more positive than negative WOM.  And what’s more, positive WOM is even more prevalent in key product categories, topping out at

LONDON, March 6, 2014 /PRNewswire – Data from marketing research group Keller Fay’s TalkTrack® programme indicates that negative word of mouth (WOM) for telecom companies providing phone, TV and broadband services in Britain is higher than for most other sectors. Every day in the UK, an estimated 3 million negative opinions are exchanged about one or other of five major providers – BT, Sky, Virgin Media, TalkTalk or Plusnet TalkTalk attracted 29% negative WOM, a figure which is almost three times the UK all-category average (10%). The performance of BT is not much better, receiving negative press in over a quarter of discussions. Plusnet is the best of the providers, recording the lowest criticism and achieving the highest level of positive sentiment (58%) – although even this fails to impress when it is compared to the UK all-category average of 62%. Plusnet’s

Preview of ReThink 2014 Presentation March 23-26 NYC Presenters Beth Rockwood, Senior Vice President, Market Resources, Discovery Communications and Ed Keller, CEO, The Keller Fay Group Almost no topic captures more attention in the media and marketing trade press than social TV.  Keller Fay has been undertaking an ambitious research project on behalf of the Council for Research Excellence (CRE) to help the industry better understand the role of social media in driving television viewing behavior. Ed Keller and Discovery’s Beth Rockwood will be unveiling the new research at the Advertising Research Foundation’s Re:Think 2014, and give a preview in this video: The research that is being presented is the most extensive investigation of role of social media behavior related to television viewing ever undertaken.  It builds on work that Keller

  The Next Social Marketing Revolution  How to drive brand advocacy and grow your business Join us for an insider’s look into ways to tap the power of consumer conversations and turbocharge your marketing investment. You’ll hear from three leaders in the new social marketing revolution, Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Carter Nance, Executive Vice President of Crispin Porter + Bogusky, and Gregg Liebman, Senior Vice President with Telemundo. Ed will challenge you to think about whether you are engaging fully with today’s social consumer, or are you limiting yourself.  He explains why real relationships still rule, even in today’s digital age, and why all media are social.  Ed will share eye opening case studies about word of mouth success stories from his newest book, The Face-to-Face Book,

Next Wednesday, Feb. 19th, Brad Fay, COO of the Keller Fay Group, and Peter Storck, SVP of Research at House Party Inc.  will be among a panel at Social Media Week NYC addressing the question of return on investment of social marketing – both online and offline.  It’s a burning question for most marketers today:  Can you really measure the ROI of “social,” online and off? And if so, how?  In this informative session a panel of thought-leaders in social marketing measurement will provide the answers needed to measure and justify the social in marketing plans. And they’ll share about a major Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) initiative to measure the ROI of social, relative to other media. Brad Fay will discuss how brands can track their share of

by Ed Keller The Seattle Seahawk’s vaunted “12th man” and the crowd noise they generate make their home field the loudest of any stadium in the NFL.  That sound is beginning to reverberate across the nation, as the Seahawks moved up 11 places in terms of their NFL Word of Mouth ranking among the 32 teams. Nevertheless, the Denver Broncos have had a clear word of mouth lead over the Seahawks, nationwide, over the course of this football season. These are the season-to-date statistics about word of mouth for the NFL, according to the Keller Fay Group, a word of mouth marketing research company that provides ongoing word of mouth tracking including both offline conversations as well as online chatter. Denver jumped into the ranks of top 5 most talked NFL

As Keller Fay COO Brad Fay assumed the role of Chairman of Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) for 2014, he wrote this piece about WOMMA’s Tenth Anniversary for WOMMA’s All Things WOMM blog and we are reprinting it: Ten years ago, in 2004, Facebook was still a Harvard student experiment known as “thefacebook.” The founding of Twitter was still two years away. But three innovative entrepreneurs knew that consumer marketing was about to experience a gigantic change. They foresaw the rapid rise of peer-to-peer consumer influence, online sharing and a two-way communications dialog between brands and their customers. Those prescient men were David Balter, CEO and founder of BzzAgent; Pete Blacksaw, then CMO of Intelliseek; and Jonathan Carson, then CEO of Buzzmetrics which later acquired Intelliseek and was acquired

TOP