Mediapost’s Marketing Daily Commentary by Ed Keller, October 22, 2013 – Location, Location, Location – brands in pursuit of all-important consumer word of mouth and advocacy cannot afford to ignore it, same as channels or demographics. Read Ed Keller’s take in MediaPost on what goes into marketer’s ‘secret sauce’.  Based upon a new research study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities”. Read more at Mediapost.com: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/210949/for-word-of-mouth-the-secret-sauce-lies-in-the-so.html?edition=66019#ixzz2iW6oVQ9W

Article by Bruce Horovitz in USAToday.com Consumers can’t seem to talk enough about brands in some towns and marketers are listening If you’re a car brand, you’re the talk of the town in Houston. If you’re a financial service brand, Jacksonville is where folks are likely to chat you up. And if you’re some sort of travel services company, Miami is the hub for brand chatter. Talk creates sales. Marketers are just beginning to discover that consumers in some cities are far more talkative about their brands than folks living in other cities. For that matter, residents of these same three cities — Houston, Jacksonville and Miami — are more likely than residents of any other major U.S. cities to have verbal or online conversations about brands of any kind.

Keller Fay Group Study Reveals Top 10 Ranking, Highlighting Opportunities for Brand Marketers to Drive Recommendations, Especially “Down South” Houston More Likely to Talk About Automotive (+37%), Jacksonville – Finance (+56%), Miami – Travel (+75%) New Brunswick, NJ – October 21, 2013 – Are certain U.S. cities more “talkative” about brands than others? A new study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities,” released by leading word-of-mouth research company, The Keller Fay Group, reveals that residents of Houston, TX have an average of 95 consumer conversations per person per week, more than the residents of any other major city in the United States. As marketers are increasingly recognizing the significant role that word of mouth (WOM) plays in driving business outcomes such as sales, results suggest that certain cities are more WOM-focused than

America’s Most Talkative Cities

Monday, 21 October 2013 by

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The potential of social ads is to replicate online what marketers have long known is effective in the real world: a word-of-mouth endorsement from a friend. Google Inc. plans to make its users the stars of advertisements—without first asking for permission. The move encourages word-of-mouth marketing but is bound to raise privacy alarms. Behind the privacy debate is another question: Do online ads with social cues work? Ed Keller comments to The Wall Street Journal’s Geoff Fowler. http://on.wsj.com/1hPL0Lh

For the second week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows. You’re used to seeing data about conversations happening in social media, but what about offline conversations? Enter the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking “real world” word-of-mouth conversations. Ad Age worked with Keller Fay to generate the following chart of the top ten most talked about new tv shows. Real world popularity trends are unfolding as the season gets underway: Read the Keller Fay analysis on AdAge ..

Today Nielsen introduced Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, a product intended to measure the activity and reach of Twitter conversation about shows.  According to an Oct. 6th article in the New York Times, the new product has yet to be embraced by network executives or gain a broad client base among advertisers.  Brands must not overlook the fact that “the overwhelming majority of conversations about TV shows still take place offline,” said Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, who was interviewed by Brian Stelter of the New York Times.  “The conversations that take place in the real world can often be quite different from those that take place on social media,” Mr. Keller stated.  Read more at the New York Times (tiered subscription model) …

Fall is here, and with it everyone is talking football. Well, not everyone, perhaps. But befitting the nation’s most popular sport, it generates a huge amount of conversation. According to my firm’s research, there are 15 billion annual WOM impressions about football. In fact, over the course of the year, fully a third of all conversations about sports are about NFL teams. Which teams get the most chatter? That depends heavily on whether you measure via social media, or whether you also include the 90% of conversations that take place offline. With the NFL – as with so many areas of American life that we look at – it turns out the two conversations are quite different. As noted in my recent blog post, an ambitious academic research study that

Despite all the talk of social media, local TV apparently sparks more conversations than its competitors —and the vast majority of them actually take place in person. Drawn from a sample of 2,011 American adults 18+, weighted to demographically reflect the 2010 U.S. Census, the study was conducted by The Keller Fay Group, a full-service marketing research and consultancy dedicated to Word-of-Mouth marketing. “We may feel like we’re living in an over-digitized world of communication — and we are — but the truth is that most people have their conversations face-to-face,” TVB research chief Stacey Lynn Schulman said Wednesday. Speaking at the TVB Forward conference in New York, Schulman of the not-for-profit trade association said that that a national survey the organization had conducted in April shows that 77% of

Robust new study shows drivers of word of mouth differ considerably for online vs. offline word of mouth, emotions tend to rule more offline with friends. These findings are significant for brand marketing decisions.

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