The American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF) announced on January 7th that Ed Keller and Brad Fay’s The Face-to-Face Book: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace and Daniel Pink’s To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others as the co-winners of the 2013 Berry-AMA Book Prize for the best marketing book. The selection of the Berry-AMA Book Prize winners and finalists included a five member team of marketing experts led by the AMA VP of Publications Robert Lusch, James and Pamela Muzzy Chair in Entrepreneurship and Executive Director, McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship, Eller College of Management, University of Arizona.  The judging panel also included William Cron (Texas Christian University), Michael Krauss (Market Strategy Group), Gordon Wyner (Millward Brown Inc.), and Valarie Zeithaml (University of North Carolina). According

David Poltrack, Chief Research Officer at CBS, says that Facebook has significantly better Social TV data than Twitter and Nielsen, and Social TV and second screens open up billions of dollars in new revenue opportunities for broadcasters. Article on, Dec. 19, 2013 Speaking at the UBS 41st Annual Global Media and Communications Conference, he said: Facebook is developing its own Social TV metric, with encouragement from CBS It already provides better Social TV data than the Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings from Nielsen’s SocialGuide division Social TV and second screen initiatives can enable CBS and other US broadcasters to tap $88 billion of potential new revenue Why Facebook’s Social TV data is better than Twitter’s Poltrack revealed that Facebook is working on its own Social TV metric, with input from

An estimated 4 million negative daily opinions are exchanged about one of the big six energy brands The UK’s top six utility companies receive masses of social media negativity Keller Fay Group research unveils Data from Keller Fay’s TalkTrack research programme indicates Britain’s biggest energy companies are receiving huge levels of total word of mouth negativity. According to the Keller Fay Group research, British Gas is attracting 39% of all negative WOM, greater than its market share and above the level of competitors, even allowing for its larger customer base. While Consumer Futures claims npower is the worst for complaints volumes, for negative WOM, British Gas receives the unfavourable label of being the worst. Steve Thomson, Managing Director of Keller Fay UK explains, “Energy brands have few fans, and generating positive brand

Executive Breakfast: Talk is cheap but Word of Mouth is Priceless! When:   Tuesday, November 12, 8:30am until 10:30am Where:  Turner Broadcasting, 1050 Techwood Drive, Northwest Atlanta, GA 30318 As part of our series of executive briefings, join us to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships in today’s Digital Marketplace, as well as brand-new research findings on Social TV. You’ll hear from three thought leaders in the new social-marketing revolution: Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Peter Storck, industry pioneer and SVP/Research at House Party and Dr. Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS, Inc.). Find out more at

Brand Chatter in Charlotte

Wednesday, 06 November 2013 by

Charlotte, NC –  The south may be more talkative than other places around the country but some of its cities are more so than others. As seen in the following video news clip, the newscasters at WCCB-TV Charlotte were downright chatty discussing how Charlotte compared to other cities and why their area might be talking less than average about brand preferences than people in other cities. That’s the finding of a study by the Keller Fay Group, consumer conversation experts. The company’s COO Brad Fay was interviewed in the following WCCB segment about his research which found that the average person has about 79 brand related conversations per week in most cities.  Charlotteans only have about 72 such conversations – less than both Atlanta and Raleigh.  It’s something marketers and advertisers

Study reveals radio’s ability to ignite social activity for advertisersFrom Inside Radio News, Nov. 5, 2013 Heavy radio listeners talk more about advertised brands and wield more clout among consumers than heavy users of TV and the internet, making them a highly attractive target for advertisers.  So says a new study that looks at radio’s strength as a social medium that sparks brand conversations. Conducted by word-of-mouth researcher Keller Fay Group and commissioned by Nielsen Audio, the study begins with the premise that word-of-mouth about a brand or product can amplify the marketer’s message beyond those who are merely exposed to the advertising.  Using data from Keller Fay’s TalkTrack nationally syndicated service, it shows that radio listeners, especially heavy users, are highly engaged in word of mouth, both online and

At the recent 2013 Marketing Forum in Scotsdale, invitee Suzanne Fanning, ‘one of marketing’s top movers and shakers’ as per Forbes, pointed to total social or word of mouth as a hot marketing trend. In an Oct. 28th article, “A Sneak Peek at 2014 Marketing Trends and Other Hot Topics,” Suzanne noted that: “While all areas of social are important, Suzanne distinguishes between WOM and most digital-only forms of social engagement because WOM transcends all vehicles. According to Keller Fay research, only 10% of consumer conversations occur online with the other 90% occurring elsewhere, making WOM engagement broader than digital engagement.” Read full article on ….

Article by Bruce Horovitz in Consumers can’t seem to talk enough about brands in some towns and marketers are listening If you’re a car brand, you’re the talk of the town in Houston. If you’re a financial service brand, Jacksonville is where folks are likely to chat you up. And if you’re some sort of travel services company, Miami is the hub for brand chatter. Talk creates sales. Marketers are just beginning to discover that consumers in some cities are far more talkative about their brands than folks living in other cities. For that matter, residents of these same three cities — Houston, Jacksonville and Miami — are more likely than residents of any other major U.S. cities to have verbal or online conversations about brands of any kind.

The potential of social ads is to replicate online what marketers have long known is effective in the real world: a word-of-mouth endorsement from a friend. Google Inc. plans to make its users the stars of advertisements—without first asking for permission. The move encourages word-of-mouth marketing but is bound to raise privacy alarms. Behind the privacy debate is another question: Do online ads with social cues work? Ed Keller comments to The Wall Street Journal’s Geoff Fowler.

Today Nielsen introduced Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, a product intended to measure the activity and reach of Twitter conversation about shows.  According to an Oct. 6th article in the New York Times, the new product has yet to be embraced by network executives or gain a broad client base among advertisers.  Brands must not overlook the fact that “the overwhelming majority of conversations about TV shows still take place offline,” said Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, who was interviewed by Brian Stelter of the New York Times.  “The conversations that take place in the real world can often be quite different from those that take place on social media,” Mr. Keller stated.  Read more at the New York Times (tiered subscription model) …