Considerable attention has been paid lately to quantifying the role of word of mouth and social media in driving sales.  Is it a critical business driver, or a “nice to have”? From our research, we know that advertising coupled with word-of-mouth is a powerful driver of sales. About one-third of the sales impact is attributable to WOM acting as an “amplifier” to paid media, such as television, with consumers spreading advertised messages. A landmark study commissioned by the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) and conducted by the market mix modelers at Analytic Partners measured the impact of consumer word of mouth in six diverse categories, and found that online and offline consumer conversations and recommendations account for 13% of consumer sales, on average. That represents $6 trillion in annual consumer

Marketing mix research tells us that advertising and word-of-mouth are significant drivers of sales. We also know that advertising has a greater impact when it generates word-of-mouth. According to a 2014 marketing mix project by Analytic Partners for the Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA), about a third of the sales impact of word-of-mouth is attributable to it acting as an amplifier to paid media. Yet only some television advertising is effective at sparking conversations. In a recent study, advertising agency UM evaluated the types of messages that were more likely to be shared online. And to better understand which types of creative are most likely to generate word-of-mouth, Keller Fay Group partnered with CBS to test the “talkability” of advertising creative. The results of each study provide valuable guidance

Engagement Labs Ranks the Top Performing Advertisers and Sponsors of The Big Game on Social Media TORONTO, Ontario — February 8, 2016 – Technology and data company Engagement Labs, creator of eValue Analytics™ score, today released Total SocialTM rankings of the top performing advertisers and sponsors of the Big Game on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, which took place on February 7, 2016. The opportunity for brand amplification both online and offline has never been bigger than during the Big Game. Conversations online and offline are augmenting each other to drive a bonanza of dialogue – superseding all demographics and standard advertising metrics. It is no surprise to see advertisers and sponsors spending millions of dollars to attach themselves to the event. eValue Rankings of the Top Ten Performing Advertisers on Facebook,

Offline word-of-mouth impression drives at least 5 times – and up to as much as 100 times – more sales – than a paid advertising impression. Thus, it pays for brands to create advertising campaigns that get people talking. This isn’t as easy as it seems. If it were, both brands and agencies would be consistently successful. But brands and agencies that build “creating buzz” directly into creative process itself find they can more reliably drive conversation with their campaigns. One agency that does this exceedingly well is CP+B Group, whose co-founder and Chairman, Chuck Porter, spoke at the PR Summit hosted by the Holmes Report last fall. The war is over. #PR won. Inspiring thoughts from Chuck Porter about the power of what we do. #PRSummit pic.twitter.com/joLywjpA3A — Elise

Why does “social marketing” work amazingly well? Because humans are “hardwired to be social.” PBS recently aired a special featuring biologist E.O. Wilson: “Of Ants and Men,” which can be viewed in its entirety on the PBS website. The documentary presents the evolutionary science of how and why humans are social creatures. It also provides compelling evidence of why marketing professionals should focus on word-of-mouth and social marketing. While face-to-face conversation may be as old as time, our understanding of the importance of social interaction is new and still emerging. Scientists like Wilson – as well as anthropologists, evolutionary biologists, social psychologists, neuroscientists, epidemiologists, network theorists, and more— are uncovering powerful new evidence of just how connected we are to each other and the degree to which our decisions, large

It’s the perennial question for marketing professionals: What’s the best use of my budget to get the greatest impact on sales? Everyone wants to be smarter about how they allocate funds in the marketing mix, so it’s interesting to look at how the top U.S. Leading National Advertisers are dividing up their pies. In 2014, these 200 brands continued to invest most heavily in television and cable advertising (a 68.5% share), but they increased the share they spend on digital media, especially search, video, and mobile, according to AdAge. Over the last few years, one of the biggest shifts we’ve seen in our research about consumer word of mouth is the rising role that digital media now play in getting people to talk about brands. Between the second quarter of

By Ed Keller The relationship between social media and TV is of considerable interest to media owners, agencies, and brands.  Twitter is investing heavily to buy social media monitoring companies, and Facebook too is seeking to bolster its claim on social engagement with TV.  There’s no doubt that ‘Social TV’ has become the subject of much speculation. But just how significant is the television viewer’s engagement with social media while they are watching prime time TV?   Are certain demographic groups more engaged socially than others when it comes to TV, and are they the ones we generally associated with social media?  What about genres – which capture the greatest degree of social engagement?  These and other questions are answered by a major new study that was recently released study by

by Ed Keller The Seattle Seahawk’s vaunted “12th man” and the crowd noise they generate make their home field the loudest of any stadium in the NFL.  That sound is beginning to reverberate across the nation, as the Seahawks moved up 11 places in terms of their NFL Word of Mouth ranking among the 32 teams. Nevertheless, the Denver Broncos have had a clear word of mouth lead over the Seahawks, nationwide, over the course of this football season. These are the season-to-date statistics about word of mouth for the NFL, according to the Keller Fay Group, a word of mouth marketing research company that provides ongoing word of mouth tracking including both offline conversations as well as online chatter. Denver jumped into the ranks of top 5 most talked NFL

Executive Breakfast: Talk is cheap but Word of Mouth is Priceless! When:   Tuesday, November 12, 8:30am until 10:30am Where:  Turner Broadcasting, 1050 Techwood Drive, Northwest Atlanta, GA 30318 As part of our series of executive briefings, join us to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships in today’s Digital Marketplace, as well as brand-new research findings on Social TV. You’ll hear from three thought leaders in the new social-marketing revolution: Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Peter Storck, industry pioneer and SVP/Research at House Party and Dr. Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS, Inc.). Find out more at http://breakfastinatlanta.eventbrite.com/

Brand Chatter in Charlotte

Wednesday, 06 November 2013 by

Charlotte, NC –  The south may be more talkative than other places around the country but some of its cities are more so than others. As seen in the following video news clip, the newscasters at WCCB-TV Charlotte were downright chatty discussing how Charlotte compared to other cities and why their area might be talking less than average about brand preferences than people in other cities. That’s the finding of a study by the Keller Fay Group, consumer conversation experts. The company’s COO Brad Fay was interviewed in the following WCCB segment about his research which found that the average person has about 79 brand related conversations per week in most cities.  Charlotteans only have about 72 such conversations – less than both Atlanta and Raleigh.  It’s something marketers and advertisers

TOP