How to Quantify the Sales Impact ROI of Word of Mouth Did you miss our complimentary webinar ?  Good news – you may still view the recording of this lively discussion with Speakers Ed Keller, CEO, Keller Fay Group and Greg Pharo, Director, Market Research and Analysis, AT&T Mobility. One of the biggest challenges facing marketers when it comes to word of mouth (WOM) and social media is a lack of ROI.  Can word of mouth advocacy be linked to business outcomes, and how strong is its impact relative to other parts of the marketing mix? In this webinar we discuss the ROI of Word of Mouth and how this measure is being tackled by AT&T and can be addressed by your business, too. Watch AT&T and Keller Fay leaders in this

By Ed Keller The relationship between social media and TV is of considerable interest to media owners, agencies, and brands.  Twitter is investing heavily to buy social media monitoring companies, and Facebook too is seeking to bolster its claim on social engagement with TV.  There’s no doubt that ‘Social TV’ has become the subject of much speculation. But just how significant is the television viewer’s engagement with social media while they are watching prime time TV?   Are certain demographic groups more engaged socially than others when it comes to TV, and are they the ones we generally associated with social media?  What about genres – which capture the greatest degree of social engagement?  These and other questions are answered by a major new study that was recently released study by

Executive Breakfast: Talk is cheap but Word of Mouth is Priceless! When:   Tuesday, November 12, 8:30am until 10:30am Where:  Turner Broadcasting, 1050 Techwood Drive, Northwest Atlanta, GA 30318 As part of our series of executive briefings, join us to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships in today’s Digital Marketplace, as well as brand-new research findings on Social TV. You’ll hear from three thought leaders in the new social-marketing revolution: Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Peter Storck, industry pioneer and SVP/Research at House Party and Dr. Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS, Inc.). Find out more at http://breakfastinatlanta.eventbrite.com/

Brand Chatter in Charlotte

Wednesday, 06 November 2013 by

Charlotte, NC –  The south may be more talkative than other places around the country but some of its cities are more so than others. As seen in the following video news clip, the newscasters at WCCB-TV Charlotte were downright chatty discussing how Charlotte compared to other cities and why their area might be talking less than average about brand preferences than people in other cities. That’s the finding of a study by the Keller Fay Group, consumer conversation experts. The company’s COO Brad Fay was interviewed in the following WCCB segment about his research which found that the average person has about 79 brand related conversations per week in most cities.  Charlotteans only have about 72 such conversations – less than both Atlanta and Raleigh.  It’s something marketers and advertisers

Mediapost’s Marketing Daily Commentary by Ed Keller, October 22, 2013 – Location, Location, Location – brands in pursuit of all-important consumer word of mouth and advocacy cannot afford to ignore it, same as channels or demographics. Read Ed Keller’s take in MediaPost on what goes into marketer’s ‘secret sauce’.  Based upon a new research study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities”. Read more at Mediapost.com: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/210949/for-word-of-mouth-the-secret-sauce-lies-in-the-so.html?edition=66019#ixzz2iW6oVQ9W

  Keller Fay Group Study Reveals Top 10 Ranking, Highlighting Opportunities for Brand Marketers to Drive Recommendations, Especially “Down South” Houston More Likely to Talk About Automotive (+37%), Jacksonville – Finance (+56%), Miami – Travel (+75%) New Brunswick, NJ – October 21, 2013 – Are certain U.S. cities more “talkative” about brands than others? A new study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities,” released by leading word-of-mouth research company, The Keller Fay Group, reveals that residents of Houston, TX have an average of 95 consumer conversations per person per week, more than the residents of any other major city in the United States. As marketers are increasingly recognizing the significant role that word of mouth (WOM) plays in driving business outcomes such as sales, results suggest that certain cities are more WOM-focused

America’s Most Talkative Cities

Monday, 21 October 2013 by

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The potential of social ads is to replicate online what marketers have long known is effective in the real world: a word-of-mouth endorsement from a friend. Google Inc. plans to make its users the stars of advertisements—without first asking for permission. The move encourages word-of-mouth marketing but is bound to raise privacy alarms. Behind the privacy debate is another question: Do online ads with social cues work? Ed Keller comments to The Wall Street Journal’s Geoff Fowler. http://on.wsj.com/1hPL0Lh

For the second week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows. You’re used to seeing data about conversations happening in social media, but what about offline conversations? Enter the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking “real world” word-of-mouth conversations. Ad Age worked with Keller Fay to generate the following chart of the top ten most talked about new tv shows. Real world popularity trends are unfolding as the season gets underway: Read the Keller Fay analysis on AdAge ..

Today Nielsen introduced Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings, a product intended to measure the activity and reach of Twitter conversation about shows.  According to an Oct. 6th article in the New York Times, the new product has yet to be embraced by network executives or gain a broad client base among advertisers.  Brands must not overlook the fact that “the overwhelming majority of conversations about TV shows still take place offline,” said Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, who was interviewed by Brian Stelter of the New York Times.  “The conversations that take place in the real world can often be quite different from those that take place on social media,” Mr. Keller stated.  Read more at the New York Times (tiered subscription model) …

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