In 2000, Malcolm Gladwell popularized the idea of influencers with the publication of The Tipping Point, which introduced the marketing community to “The Law of the Few,” comprised of Connectors, Mavens and Salesmen. “The success of any kind of social epidemic,” Gladwell argued, “is heavily dependent on the involvement of people with a particular and rare set of social gifts.” More recently, in this age of Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, some marketers have begun to focus their influencer efforts on celebrities—people like Kim Kardashian and her tens of millions of followers or fans on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook— whom they believe can influence people through their endorsements, especially via social media. But research proves that everyday people have significant value to marketers. They should be central to any influencer marketing

In marketing and advertising, the image typically conjured of an “influencer” is that of a celebrity or person with a large following on social media. But here at Keller Fay Group, we imagine a much different type of influencer. In our experience, an influencer is best defined as “a person who has a greater than average reach or impact through word of mouth in a relevant marketplace.” This means that an influencer does not have to be a celebrity, or even a blogger with a huge platform, though those two types of people certainly have influence. Our research demonstrates that everyday people have a tremendous impact on the decisions consumers make in the marketplace. In fact, they can have a greater influence than a celebrity, the CEO of a company or

How News Media Drives Conversation

Tuesday, 15 July 2014 by

A recent Brand Republic article discusses how the Guardian partners with Keller Fay to measure word of mouth in social media and offline, and shows how WOM extends audience reach for brands advertising in news media. “More and more this will become a must-have metric by marketers, and media organisations need to be able to show this and invest in ways to prove their social worth” according to The Guardian’s Commercial Director Nick Hewitt.  (Read more at http://www.brandrepublic.com/news/1302639/guardians-commercial-leader-adapting-changing-face-roi/.) Our UK MD Steve Thomson co-wrote a recent Admap article on “Print Media’s Talkability” (click link for PDF of article) with Ozoda Muminova from Guardian News & Media which provides further evidence that newspapers and other news media can make a valuable contribution to stimulating WOM for brands.  News media – especially quality newspapers such as The

New study finds that broadcast content is the dominant television resource for local political information.  More than half of all respondents (61%) source their local political conversations from something they saw or heard on local news programming alone. Furthermore, broadcast television websites accounted for 4 of the top 5 online influencers, outpacing social media sources by a ratio of 3:1. In fact, if you’re relying on social media to monitor “the local political conversation”, you’re only capturing about 4% of the electorate’s sentiment. To determine the currency value of local news, TVB (the not-for-profit trade association of America’s commercial broadcast television industry) worked with The Keller Fay Group, a full service marketing research and consulting company dedicated exclusively to word-of-mouth marketing. Television has always been a mass medium, allowing candidates to

By Ed Keller Everyone, it seems, has heard that people are far more likely to share their bad brand experiences than positive ones.  Probe further about whether they have actually seen evidence of that, and the answer is generally, “no, but I’ve heard it’s true.” Well, the fact is, it’s not true.  Positive WOM is far more prevalent than negative WOM, and has a greater impact.  For brands, there is far more to be gained than feared by being part of organic consumer conversation. To start, more than two-thirds of all brand-related WOM is generally positive in nature, while less than 10% is generally negative.  That’s over eight times more positive than negative WOM.  And what’s more, positive WOM is even more prevalent in key product categories, topping out at

  The Next Social Marketing Revolution  How to drive brand advocacy and grow your business Join us for an insider’s look into ways to tap the power of consumer conversations and turbocharge your marketing investment. You’ll hear from three leaders in the new social marketing revolution, Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Carter Nance, Executive Vice President of Crispin Porter + Bogusky, and Gregg Liebman, Senior Vice President with Telemundo. Ed will challenge you to think about whether you are engaging fully with today’s social consumer, or are you limiting yourself.  He explains why real relationships still rule, even in today’s digital age, and why all media are social.  Ed will share eye opening case studies about word of mouth success stories from his newest book, The Face-to-Face Book,

The American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF) announced on January 7th that Ed Keller and Brad Fay’s The Face-to-Face Book: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace and Daniel Pink’s To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others as the co-winners of the 2013 Berry-AMA Book Prize for the best marketing book. The selection of the Berry-AMA Book Prize winners and finalists included a five member team of marketing experts led by the AMA VP of Publications Robert Lusch, James and Pamela Muzzy Chair in Entrepreneurship and Executive Director, McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship, Eller College of Management, University of Arizona.  The judging panel also included William Cron (Texas Christian University), Michael Krauss (Market Strategy Group), Gordon Wyner (Millward Brown Inc.), and Valarie Zeithaml (University of North Carolina). According

Brand Chatter in Charlotte

Wednesday, 06 November 2013 by

Charlotte, NC –  The south may be more talkative than other places around the country but some of its cities are more so than others. As seen in the following video news clip, the newscasters at WCCB-TV Charlotte were downright chatty discussing how Charlotte compared to other cities and why their area might be talking less than average about brand preferences than people in other cities. That’s the finding of a study by the Keller Fay Group, consumer conversation experts. The company’s COO Brad Fay was interviewed in the following WCCB segment about his research which found that the average person has about 79 brand related conversations per week in most cities.  Charlotteans only have about 72 such conversations – less than both Atlanta and Raleigh.  It’s something marketers and advertisers

Study reveals radio’s ability to ignite social activity for advertisersFrom Inside Radio News, Nov. 5, 2013 Heavy radio listeners talk more about advertised brands and wield more clout among consumers than heavy users of TV and the internet, making them a highly attractive target for advertisers.  So says a new study that looks at radio’s strength as a social medium that sparks brand conversations. Conducted by word-of-mouth researcher Keller Fay Group and commissioned by Nielsen Audio, the study begins with the premise that word-of-mouth about a brand or product can amplify the marketer’s message beyond those who are merely exposed to the advertising.  Using data from Keller Fay’s TalkTrack nationally syndicated service, it shows that radio listeners, especially heavy users, are highly engaged in word of mouth, both online and

  Keller Fay Group Study Reveals Top 10 Ranking, Highlighting Opportunities for Brand Marketers to Drive Recommendations, Especially “Down South” Houston More Likely to Talk About Automotive (+37%), Jacksonville – Finance (+56%), Miami – Travel (+75%) New Brunswick, NJ – October 21, 2013 – Are certain U.S. cities more “talkative” about brands than others? A new study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities,” released by leading word-of-mouth research company, The Keller Fay Group, reveals that residents of Houston, TX have an average of 95 consumer conversations per person per week, more than the residents of any other major city in the United States. As marketers are increasingly recognizing the significant role that word of mouth (WOM) plays in driving business outcomes such as sales, results suggest that certain cities are more WOM-focused

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