Marketing teams continue to pour resources into social media marketing, but could they be missing opportunities to reach people who buy and recommend their products? While it’s true that online conversations are growing and are an important piece of overall marketing strategy, you might be surprised to learn that offline conversations have a greater influence on consumer purchase decisions. Brad Fay, Chief Research Officer, Engagement Labs, and Chief Operating Officer, Keller Fay Group, recently penned an article for MediaPost, discussing how an integrated marketing strategy will help CMOs and their teams drive more social influence. You can read the full article here.

Who has the biggest impact on buying decisions? New Keller Fay research shows that people overwhelmingly trust the recommendations of micro influencers. Micro-influencers are not traditional celebrities, but rather individuals who work in their category or are truly knowledgeable, passionate and authentic and are seen as a trusted source when it comes to recommendations for what to buy. This new research adds new insight into why these are the people brands should be targeting to spread the word about their products and services, building on the firm’s decade+ expertise into influencer marketing that started with the publication of Ed Keller’s book, The Influentials:  One American in Ten Tells the Other Nine How to Vote, Where to Eat, and What to Buy. In this recently released study for client, Experticity, the

In marketing and advertising, the image typically conjured of an “influencer” is that of a celebrity or person with a large following on social media. But here at Keller Fay Group, we imagine a much different type of influencer. In our experience, an influencer is best defined as “a person who has a greater than average reach or impact through word of mouth in a relevant marketplace.” This means that an influencer does not have to be a celebrity, or even a blogger with a huge platform, though those two types of people certainly have influence. Our research demonstrates that everyday people have a tremendous impact on the decisions consumers make in the marketplace. In fact, they can have a greater influence than a celebrity, the CEO of a company or

How News Media Drives Conversation

Tuesday, 15 July 2014 by

A recent Brand Republic article discusses how the Guardian partners with Keller Fay to measure word of mouth in social media and offline, and shows how WOM extends audience reach for brands advertising in news media. “More and more this will become a must-have metric by marketers, and media organisations need to be able to show this and invest in ways to prove their social worth” according to The Guardian’s Commercial Director Nick Hewitt.  (Read more at http://www.brandrepublic.com/news/1302639/guardians-commercial-leader-adapting-changing-face-roi/.) Our UK MD Steve Thomson co-wrote a recent Admap article on “Print Media’s Talkability” (click link for PDF of article) with Ozoda Muminova from Guardian News & Media which provides further evidence that newspapers and other news media can make a valuable contribution to stimulating WOM for brands.  News media – especially quality newspapers such as The

“Unpacking Corporate Purpose” is a newly released study about the role of the corporation in society.  In-depth interviews were conducted among very senior executives, financial leaders, and educators in business and finance from organizations as diverse as BlackRock, Harvard University, Kellogg School of Management, Kroger, and LinkedIn.  It was conducted by the Keller Fay Group for the The Business & Society Program of the highly regarded Aspen Institute..  The study probes important questions about the purpose of corporations – to serve investors, or customers, or society-at-large; and what are the hallmarks of a successful business.  The Aspen Institute plans to use the research to spark a dialogue about this important and timely topic and we hope you’ll participate. Click this link to learn more about the “Unpacking Corporate Purpose” study on the Aspen Institute website and follow this link

New study finds that broadcast content is the dominant television resource for local political information.  More than half of all respondents (61%) source their local political conversations from something they saw or heard on local news programming alone. Furthermore, broadcast television websites accounted for 4 of the top 5 online influencers, outpacing social media sources by a ratio of 3:1. In fact, if you’re relying on social media to monitor “the local political conversation”, you’re only capturing about 4% of the electorate’s sentiment. To determine the currency value of local news, TVB (the not-for-profit trade association of America’s commercial broadcast television industry) worked with The Keller Fay Group, a full service marketing research and consulting company dedicated exclusively to word-of-mouth marketing. Television has always been a mass medium, allowing candidates to

Study reveals radio’s ability to ignite social activity for advertisersFrom Inside Radio News, Nov. 5, 2013 Heavy radio listeners talk more about advertised brands and wield more clout among consumers than heavy users of TV and the internet, making them a highly attractive target for advertisers.  So says a new study that looks at radio’s strength as a social medium that sparks brand conversations. Conducted by word-of-mouth researcher Keller Fay Group and commissioned by Nielsen Audio, the study begins with the premise that word-of-mouth about a brand or product can amplify the marketer’s message beyond those who are merely exposed to the advertising.  Using data from Keller Fay’s TalkTrack nationally syndicated service, it shows that radio listeners, especially heavy users, are highly engaged in word of mouth, both online and

The potential of social ads is to replicate online what marketers have long known is effective in the real world: a word-of-mouth endorsement from a friend. Google Inc. plans to make its users the stars of advertisements—without first asking for permission. The move encourages word-of-mouth marketing but is bound to raise privacy alarms. Behind the privacy debate is another question: Do online ads with social cues work? Ed Keller comments to The Wall Street Journal’s Geoff Fowler. http://on.wsj.com/1hPL0Lh

Despite all the talk of social media, local TV apparently sparks more conversations than its competitors —and the vast majority of them actually take place in person. Drawn from a sample of 2,011 American adults 18+, weighted to demographically reflect the 2010 U.S. Census, the study was conducted by The Keller Fay Group, a full-service marketing research and consultancy dedicated to Word-of-Mouth marketing. “We may feel like we’re living in an over-digitized world of communication — and we are — but the truth is that most people have their conversations face-to-face,” TVB research chief Stacey Lynn Schulman said Wednesday. Speaking at the TVB Forward conference in New York, Schulman of the not-for-profit trade association said that that a national survey the organization had conducted in April shows that 77% of

How Influence Works

Wednesday, 05 December 2012 by

What is the state of the art today for identifying and marketing to consumers who have the most influence in the marketplace? Has the advent of enormous online social networks, like Twitter and Facebook, re-written the manual for influencer marketing? The answer – an emphatic ‘no’ – may come as a surprise to you. Read Ed Keller’s new article in the December 2012 issue of Admap. More >

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