Teenagers’ Conversations About Cars Declined 27 Percent Over the Last Six Years, According to Research by Keller Fay Group TORONTO, ON–(Marketwired – January 25, 2016) – Keller Fay Group, an Engagement Labs (TSX VENTURE: EL) company, in partnership with Morpace, Inc. a full-service marketing research and consulting firm, today released word of mouth (WOM) research that found teenagers, between the ages 13-17, are talking far less often about car brands than teenagers six years ago. The results of the study potentially signal a major change for the automobile industry and the broader automotive culture. 2016 ranks the first year when those born at the beginning of the 21st century will have the opportunity to get their driver’s license. According to Keller Fay’s WOM research, there was a 27 percent decline within

Preview of ReThink 2014 Presentation March 23-26 NYC Presenters Beth Rockwood, Senior Vice President, Market Resources, Discovery Communications and Ed Keller, CEO, The Keller Fay Group Almost no topic captures more attention in the media and marketing trade press than social TV.  Keller Fay has been undertaking an ambitious research project on behalf of the Council for Research Excellence (CRE) to help the industry better understand the role of social media in driving television viewing behavior. Ed Keller and Discovery’s Beth Rockwood will be unveiling the new research at the Advertising Research Foundation’s Re:Think 2014, and give a preview in this video: The research that is being presented is the most extensive investigation of role of social media behavior related to television viewing ever undertaken.  It builds on work that Keller

by Ed Keller The Seattle Seahawk’s vaunted “12th man” and the crowd noise they generate make their home field the loudest of any stadium in the NFL.  That sound is beginning to reverberate across the nation, as the Seahawks moved up 11 places in terms of their NFL Word of Mouth ranking among the 32 teams. Nevertheless, the Denver Broncos have had a clear word of mouth lead over the Seahawks, nationwide, over the course of this football season. These are the season-to-date statistics about word of mouth for the NFL, according to the Keller Fay Group, a word of mouth marketing research company that provides ongoing word of mouth tracking including both offline conversations as well as online chatter. Denver jumped into the ranks of top 5 most talked NFL

The American Marketing Association Foundation (AMAF) announced on January 7th that Ed Keller and Brad Fay’s The Face-to-Face Book: Why Real Relationships Rule in a Digital Marketplace and Daniel Pink’s To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others as the co-winners of the 2013 Berry-AMA Book Prize for the best marketing book. The selection of the Berry-AMA Book Prize winners and finalists included a five member team of marketing experts led by the AMA VP of Publications Robert Lusch, James and Pamela Muzzy Chair in Entrepreneurship and Executive Director, McGuire Center for Entrepreneurship, Eller College of Management, University of Arizona.  The judging panel also included William Cron (Texas Christian University), Michael Krauss (Market Strategy Group), Gordon Wyner (Millward Brown Inc.), and Valarie Zeithaml (University of North Carolina). According

How well does WOM about TV shows align with ratings?  The latest tracking from Keller Fay for Ad Age says, “Quite well.”  People talked the most about the shows they watched the most … for the most part.  So what do you think?  Does water cooler talk predict the hit series?  See the results and story on Ad Age: http://bit.ly/Hw5dL2

Mediapost’s Marketing Daily Commentary by Ed Keller, October 22, 2013 – Location, Location, Location – brands in pursuit of all-important consumer word of mouth and advocacy cannot afford to ignore it, same as channels or demographics. Read Ed Keller’s take in MediaPost on what goes into marketer’s ‘secret sauce’.  Based upon a new research study, “America’s Most Talkative Cities”. Read more at Mediapost.com: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/210949/for-word-of-mouth-the-secret-sauce-lies-in-the-so.html?edition=66019#ixzz2iW6oVQ9W

Article by Bruce Horovitz in USAToday.com Consumers can’t seem to talk enough about brands in some towns and marketers are listening If you’re a car brand, you’re the talk of the town in Houston. If you’re a financial service brand, Jacksonville is where folks are likely to chat you up. And if you’re some sort of travel services company, Miami is the hub for brand chatter. Talk creates sales. Marketers are just beginning to discover that consumers in some cities are far more talkative about their brands than folks living in other cities. For that matter, residents of these same three cities — Houston, Jacksonville and Miami — are more likely than residents of any other major U.S. cities to have verbal or online conversations about brands of any kind.

For the third week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows and listening in on “real world” conversations — not just what you see on Twitter and Facebook. We worked with the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking word-of-mouth, to generate the chart you see here. (Last week’s chart is right over here.) The data is based on interviews with a cross-section of 1,452 Americans ages 13 to 69 years old who were interviewed from Oct. 7 to Oct. 13 regarding 29 new, high-profile TV shows that have premiered already or will premiere shortly. Because the fall TV premiere schedule stretches on for weeks and weeks through September and October, Keller Fay is conducting

The potential of social ads is to replicate online what marketers have long known is effective in the real world: a word-of-mouth endorsement from a friend. Google Inc. plans to make its users the stars of advertisements—without first asking for permission. The move encourages word-of-mouth marketing but is bound to raise privacy alarms. Behind the privacy debate is another question: Do online ads with social cues work? Ed Keller comments to The Wall Street Journal’s Geoff Fowler. http://on.wsj.com/1hPL0Lh

For the second week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows. You’re used to seeing data about conversations happening in social media, but what about offline conversations? Enter the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking “real world” word-of-mouth conversations. Ad Age worked with Keller Fay to generate the following chart of the top ten most talked about new tv shows. Real world popularity trends are unfolding as the season gets underway: Read the Keller Fay analysis on AdAge ..

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