Bust out the confetti and pop some champagne bottles because we’ve got some exciting news to share… News UK, publisher of The Times and The Sun, won big at the Media Research Awards 2016, hosted by Mediatel, with their innovative Project Footprint – a research project in conjunction with Keller Fay Group, an Engagement Labs Company! Awarded for ‘driving innovation in an industry where measurement and insight are at the very heart of business planning and success’, News UK went home with the following awards: Grand Prix Best Custom Media Research Media Owner/Trade Body of the Year What is Project Footprint? Shedding new light on the true real-world and online impact of digital advertising, Project Footprint is a new groundbreaking, research program by News UK. The month-long study, conducted by

Executive Breakfast: Talk is cheap but Word of Mouth is Priceless! When:   Tuesday, November 12, 8:30am until 10:30am Where:  Turner Broadcasting, 1050 Techwood Drive, Northwest Atlanta, GA 30318 As part of our series of executive briefings, join us to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships in today’s Digital Marketplace, as well as brand-new research findings on Social TV. You’ll hear from three thought leaders in the new social-marketing revolution: Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Peter Storck, industry pioneer and SVP/Research at House Party and Dr. Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS, Inc.). Find out more at http://breakfastinatlanta.eventbrite.com/

Brand Chatter in Charlotte

Wednesday, 06 November 2013 by

Charlotte, NC –  The south may be more talkative than other places around the country but some of its cities are more so than others. As seen in the following video news clip, the newscasters at WCCB-TV Charlotte were downright chatty discussing how Charlotte compared to other cities and why their area might be talking less than average about brand preferences than people in other cities. That’s the finding of a study by the Keller Fay Group, consumer conversation experts. The company’s COO Brad Fay was interviewed in the following WCCB segment about his research which found that the average person has about 79 brand related conversations per week in most cities.  Charlotteans only have about 72 such conversations – less than both Atlanta and Raleigh.  It’s something marketers and advertisers

How well does WOM about TV shows align with ratings?  The latest tracking from Keller Fay for Ad Age says, “Quite well.”  People talked the most about the shows they watched the most … for the most part.  So what do you think?  Does water cooler talk predict the hit series?  See the results and story on Ad Age: http://bit.ly/Hw5dL2

For the third week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows and listening in on “real world” conversations — not just what you see on Twitter and Facebook. We worked with the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking word-of-mouth, to generate the chart you see here. (Last week’s chart is right over here.) The data is based on interviews with a cross-section of 1,452 Americans ages 13 to 69 years old who were interviewed from Oct. 7 to Oct. 13 regarding 29 new, high-profile TV shows that have premiered already or will premiere shortly. Because the fall TV premiere schedule stretches on for weeks and weeks through September and October, Keller Fay is conducting

Fall is here, and with it everyone is talking football. Well, not everyone, perhaps. But befitting the nation’s most popular sport, it generates a huge amount of conversation. According to my firm’s research, there are 15 billion annual WOM impressions about football. In fact, over the course of the year, fully a third of all conversations about sports are about NFL teams. Which teams get the most chatter? That depends heavily on whether you measure via social media, or whether you also include the 90% of conversations that take place offline. With the NFL – as with so many areas of American life that we look at – it turns out the two conversations are quite different. As noted in my recent blog post, an ambitious academic research study that

Keller Fay is conducting a new syndicated research study to measure word of mouth about the new TV shows that are premiering this month. The study is uniquely comprehensive in that it covers all forms of word of mouth, including the 90% of conversations about TV shows that take place offline. CBS is the first client to subscribe to this new syndicated study.

By Ed Keller Imagine you have an important marketing investment decision to make, and you have what you think is clear and compelling evidence. Then, you subsequently learn that in fact you are overestimating the impact of your investment by as much as 40%. You’d be pretty upset. This is what may be happening today as marketers seek to understand and quantify the impact of their social media investments, according to a new analysis by MarketShare. It is one of several thought provoking points put forth by Pat LaPointe, EVP at MarketShare, in a recent piece in the Journal of Advertising Research (JAR) about the relationship between “traditional” and “social” media. Business investment in social media is on the rise, a statistic most recently reinforced by a survey released recently

The new television season is upon us, and the trade press has been abuzz, not only about which new shows will thrive and which will die, but also about social media and so-called social media ratings. Senior TV executives are joining the conversation. Some see social media as a powerful amplifier and “the connective tissue that links everything together.” Others take a more tempered approach, saying, “Social media is a driver of buzz and engagement, but it’s not the core driver of revenue or ratings.” What has been completely missing from the discussion is that when it comes to social conversation about TV shows, the action is still overwhelmingly offline, not on social networking sites. In fact, more than 80% of conversations about TV shows take place face-to-face, whereas only

MediaBizBloggers.com If you want your brand to “go viral,” Twitter and Facebook are the ways to go.  Right?  Well, maybe.  But those are only two options among numerous media strategies you can employ. A new paper authored by my business partner Brad Fay, and Graeme Hutton of Universal McCann, reveals new empirical evidence of how media and advertising drive word of mouth.  Presented last month at the Advertising Research Foundation’s Audience Measurement 5.0 conference, the paper revealed a strong linkage between advertising expenditures and word of mouth.  It also found that the major media – TV, print, and online – all provide unique assets to marketers seeking to inspire and shape word of mouth about their brands.  Both the Hutton and Fay analyses leveraged my firm’s TalkTrack® syndicated study of

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