Next Wednesday, Feb. 19th, Brad Fay, COO of the Keller Fay Group, and Peter Storck, SVP of Research at House Party Inc.  will be among a panel at Social Media Week NYC addressing the question of return on investment of social marketing – both online and offline.  It’s a burning question for most marketers today:  Can you really measure the ROI of “social,” online and off? And if so, how?  In this informative session a panel of thought-leaders in social marketing measurement will provide the answers needed to measure and justify the social in marketing plans. And they’ll share about a major Word of Mouth Marketing Association (WOMMA) initiative to measure the ROI of social, relative to other media. Brad Fay will discuss how brands can track their share of

How well does WOM about TV shows align with ratings?  The latest tracking from Keller Fay for Ad Age says, “Quite well.”  People talked the most about the shows they watched the most … for the most part.  So what do you think?  Does water cooler talk predict the hit series?  See the results and story on Ad Age: http://bit.ly/Hw5dL2

Article by Bruce Horovitz in USAToday.com Consumers can’t seem to talk enough about brands in some towns and marketers are listening If you’re a car brand, you’re the talk of the town in Houston. If you’re a financial service brand, Jacksonville is where folks are likely to chat you up. And if you’re some sort of travel services company, Miami is the hub for brand chatter. Talk creates sales. Marketers are just beginning to discover that consumers in some cities are far more talkative about their brands than folks living in other cities. For that matter, residents of these same three cities — Houston, Jacksonville and Miami — are more likely than residents of any other major U.S. cities to have verbal or online conversations about brands of any kind.

For the third week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows and listening in on “real world” conversations — not just what you see on Twitter and Facebook. We worked with the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking word-of-mouth, to generate the chart you see here. (Last week’s chart is right over here.) The data is based on interviews with a cross-section of 1,452 Americans ages 13 to 69 years old who were interviewed from Oct. 7 to Oct. 13 regarding 29 new, high-profile TV shows that have premiered already or will premiere shortly. Because the fall TV premiere schedule stretches on for weeks and weeks through September and October, Keller Fay is conducting

For the second week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows. You’re used to seeing data about conversations happening in social media, but what about offline conversations? Enter the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking “real world” word-of-mouth conversations. Ad Age worked with Keller Fay to generate the following chart of the top ten most talked about new tv shows. Real world popularity trends are unfolding as the season gets underway: Read the Keller Fay analysis on AdAge ..

Fall is here, and with it everyone is talking football. Well, not everyone, perhaps. But befitting the nation’s most popular sport, it generates a huge amount of conversation. According to my firm’s research, there are 15 billion annual WOM impressions about football. In fact, over the course of the year, fully a third of all conversations about sports are about NFL teams. Which teams get the most chatter? That depends heavily on whether you measure via social media, or whether you also include the 90% of conversations that take place offline. With the NFL – as with so many areas of American life that we look at – it turns out the two conversations are quite different. As noted in my recent blog post, an ambitious academic research study that

Robust new study shows drivers of word of mouth differ considerably for online vs. offline word of mouth, emotions tend to rule more offline with friends. These findings are significant for brand marketing decisions.

Word of mouth has been proven to have a huge direct and indirect impact on consumer purchase decisions.  But what motivates people to talk about brands?  And more specifically, what determines when they decide to engage in online conversation (social media) about brands versus offline conversation (everywhere else)? “On Brands and Word of Mouth” is an important new academic research paper that has just been published in the Journal of Marketing Research.   The authors, three professors at distinguished business schools, constructed a unique data set of online and offline WOM and characteristics for more than 600 of the most talked-about U.S. brands. Their assembled data included offline word of mouth provided by the Keller Fay Group, online word of mouth provided by NM Incite, brand equity provided by Y&R’s Brand Asset

Press Release GfK MRI and Keller Fay Group Announce Fusion to Link Offline Word of Mouth to Media Audiences Product Links TalkTrack® to Print Media Currency Study New York, NY, JUNE 6, 2012—GfK MRI and the Keller Fay Group today announced that they have successfully fused together their large syndicated research databases. The resulting new product will enable media agencies and owners to plan media strategies for the purposes of maximizing consumer word of mouth about brands and companies.  The new fusion product, known as TalkTrack/GfK MRI Data Fusion™, brings together the most comprehensive word of mouth database and the leading currency study for print media. “Many of our clients tell us they are interested in how social influence and media work together, and this new product with Keller Fay

Entrepreneur.com By Mikal E. Belicove Posted November 23, 2011 The now commonly held notion that social media-related marketing is a requirement for business success may not carry as much water as once thought. Despite all the technological advances in recent years, especially in the realm of social media, a recent study suggests that the vast majority of public discussion about products, brands and services occur in everyday word-of-mouth encounters with others, not online. A yearlong study from the New Brunswick, N.J.-based research firm the Keller Fay Group, which included more than 32,000 participants, found that 91 percent of respondents’ information about brands came as a result of face-to-face conversations or over the phone. Just seven percent of word-of-mouth conversations about brands occurs online. The report shows that a well-rounded approach to

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