On June 9th Universal McCann & Keller Fay Group joined together to present at the ARF Audience Measurement conference in NYC.  Speakers Graeme Hutton, SVP, Universal McCann along with Brad Fay, COO of Keller Fay, explored a new approach to media planning – looking “beyond demographics” using word of mouth (WOM) based planning.   Drawing from insights using our Nielsen TV/TalkTrack® fusion, we find that “social” TV is much more than just tentpole events or the usual programs (e.g. sports, younger female drama).  Instead, we find a wide differentiation of “social” networks and programs depending on category.  Read through this paper to see how this new approach to media planning can help marketers, agencies and media owners alike!

By Ed Keller The relationship between social media and TV is of considerable interest to media owners, agencies, and brands.  Twitter is investing heavily to buy social media monitoring companies, and Facebook too is seeking to bolster its claim on social engagement with TV.  There’s no doubt that ‘Social TV’ has become the subject of much speculation. But just how significant is the television viewer’s engagement with social media while they are watching prime time TV?   Are certain demographic groups more engaged socially than others when it comes to TV, and are they the ones we generally associated with social media?  What about genres – which capture the greatest degree of social engagement?  These and other questions are answered by a major new study that was recently released study by

Presentation by Facebook and The Keller Fay Group on Total TV Chatter at the Advertising Research Foundation’s RE:THINK 2014, NYC, March 2014   TV viewing and program selection is a highly social phenomenon, both on-line and off-line. Nearly 50 2013 Fall TV shows were assessed by two measures: online social chatter as measured on Facebook, and offline word of mouth about television as measured by Keller Fay’s TalkTrack®. A 0.73 correlation was found between the two methods, with instructive differences based upon demographics, genre, and high-interest episodes. Responses to specific popular programs such as Dancing with the Stars, Glee, The Big Bang Theory, and Scandal were analyzed.

By VINDU GOEL  April 10, 2014, 7:00 AM on the New York Times Social Blog at: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/10/twitter-and-facebook-wield-little-influence-on-tv-watching/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&src=busln&_r=1& Listen to executives at Twitter and Facebook talk about how we watch television and you might walk away thinking that Americans are chattering nonstop on the social networks while watching their favorite shows. The reality is that most of us don’t tweet or post at all while we’re plopped in front of the tube. When we do, half the time we’re talking about something other than TV. And social media conversation is far weaker than traditional factors, like TV commercials for new shows or our sheer laziness in changing channels, in prompting us to tune into each season’s new offerings. Those are among the crucial findings of a new study released Thursday by the Council for Research

A major new study also find that half of all social media activity while watching TV relates to TV, according to Council for Research Excellence By George Winslow March 24, 2014 on B&C website at: http://www.broadcastingcable.com/news/technology/research-tv-promos-still-more-effective-social-media/129992 A new study into the relationship of social media and television finds that social media is an increasingly important component of TV viewing, with about one in six viewers using social media during primetime and that half of that social media usage was related to TV, according to a new study from the Council for Research Excellence (CRE). But the study also found that traditional TV promos remain more effective than social media and that promos and commercials were the number one drive of the decision to view new shows. Nearly two in five viewers

Preview of ReThink 2014 Presentation March 23-26 NYC Presenters Beth Rockwood, Senior Vice President, Market Resources, Discovery Communications and Ed Keller, CEO, The Keller Fay Group Almost no topic captures more attention in the media and marketing trade press than social TV.  Keller Fay has been undertaking an ambitious research project on behalf of the Council for Research Excellence (CRE) to help the industry better understand the role of social media in driving television viewing behavior. Ed Keller and Discovery’s Beth Rockwood will be unveiling the new research at the Advertising Research Foundation’s Re:Think 2014, and give a preview in this video: The research that is being presented is the most extensive investigation of role of social media behavior related to television viewing ever undertaken.  It builds on work that Keller

by Ed Keller Each December, CBS’s Chief Research Officer Dave Poltrack addresses the UBS Annual Global Media and Communications Conference.  This year’s talk, “The Outlook for the Broadcast Networks,” covered a wide range of topics, including social TV:  “Nothing was hotter this year than social media with Twitter front and center with its IPO,” according to Poltrack.  “Television programs and televised events have always been a major source of conversation. With the emergence of the online social media we are seeing how much these subjects dominate people’s non-personal interaction.” Then, in what might have been a surprise to the investors in the audience, Poltrack made this strong statement:  “However, the real action is not online, it is still face-to-face.”  And the correlation statistics he shared bear this out. To begin,

David Poltrack, Chief Research Officer at CBS, says that Facebook has significantly better Social TV data than Twitter and Nielsen, and Social TV and second screens open up billions of dollars in new revenue opportunities for broadcasters. Article on Futurescape.tv, Dec. 19, 2013 Speaking at the UBS 41st Annual Global Media and Communications Conference, he said: Facebook is developing its own Social TV metric, with encouragement from CBS It already provides better Social TV data than the Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings from Nielsen’s SocialGuide division Social TV and second screen initiatives can enable CBS and other US broadcasters to tap $88 billion of potential new revenue Why Facebook’s Social TV data is better than Twitter’s Poltrack revealed that Facebook is working on its own Social TV metric, with input from

Executive Breakfast: Talk is cheap but Word of Mouth is Priceless! When:   Tuesday, November 12, 8:30am until 10:30am Where:  Turner Broadcasting, 1050 Techwood Drive, Northwest Atlanta, GA 30318 As part of our series of executive briefings, join us to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships in today’s Digital Marketplace, as well as brand-new research findings on Social TV. You’ll hear from three thought leaders in the new social-marketing revolution: Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Peter Storck, industry pioneer and SVP/Research at House Party and Dr. Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS, Inc.). Find out more at http://breakfastinatlanta.eventbrite.com/

For the second week in a row, Ad Age is taking a broad view of the “social buzz” surrounding the fall TV season’s new shows. You’re used to seeing data about conversations happening in social media, but what about offline conversations? Enter the Keller Fay Group, a market-research firm that specializes in tracking “real world” word-of-mouth conversations. Ad Age worked with Keller Fay to generate the following chart of the top ten most talked about new tv shows. Real world popularity trends are unfolding as the season gets underway: Read the Keller Fay analysis on AdAge ..

TOP