The fall TV season is well underway, and ABC’s new TV show Quantico is getting a lot of buzz. Keller Fay Group is tracking the offline conversation weekly, and our research also shows gains for NBC’s Blindspot. “We’re seeing pretty healthy levels of talk among both men and women for those shows,” which points toward future success, Keller Fay’s Matt Phillips told USA Today, which has the results exclusively. Fox TV shows Rosewood and Minority Report both lost ground. You can read the full article here.

Nielsen & Keller Fay Group recently joined together to present a webinar: How to Use Television to Increase Word of Mouth.  Speakers Mike Hess, EVP, Data Fusion and Integration, along with Brad Fay, COO of Keller Fay, showed how word of mouth (WOM) drives sales and makes marketing significantly more effective. It is  now possible to plan media to maximize your advertising ‘s word of mouth impact. Insights were drawn from our fusion of NPM (National TV) and Talk Track (Keller Fay’s Word of Mouth measurement system). Key takeaways provides were: the role of TV in generating WOM, Word of  Mouth’s influence on purchase decisions and how to incorporate it in media plans, How planning for media “expressions” rather than “Impressions” can impact which programs are more attractive advertising vehicles. For

NIELSEN & KELLER FAY GROUP WEBINAR How to Use Television to Increase Brand Word of Mouth Date: Wednesday, May 14, 2014 Time: 2-2:45pm Eastern/1-1:45pm Central Cost: Complimentary Webinar Speakers: Mike Hess, EVP, Data Fusion and Integration Brad Fay, COO, Co-Founder of the Keller Fay Group REGISTER NOW!   Word of mouth (WOM) drives sales and makes marketing significantly more effective. And now you can plan media to maximize your advertising’s word of mouth impact. Join Nielsen and Keller Fay for this live webinar to hear key insights drawn from our fusion of NPM (National TV) and TalkTrack® (Keller Fay’s Word of Mouth measurement system).   Key takeaways will cover:   The role of TV in generating WOM Word of mouth’s influence on purchase decisions and how to incorporate it in

By Ed Keller The relationship between social media and TV is of considerable interest to media owners, agencies, and brands.  Twitter is investing heavily to buy social media monitoring companies, and Facebook too is seeking to bolster its claim on social engagement with TV.  There’s no doubt that ‘Social TV’ has become the subject of much speculation. But just how significant is the television viewer’s engagement with social media while they are watching prime time TV?   Are certain demographic groups more engaged socially than others when it comes to TV, and are they the ones we generally associated with social media?  What about genres – which capture the greatest degree of social engagement?  These and other questions are answered by a major new study that was recently released study by

By VINDU GOEL  April 10, 2014, 7:00 AM on the New York Times Social Blog at: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/04/10/twitter-and-facebook-wield-little-influence-on-tv-watching/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_php=true&_type=blogs&src=busln&_r=1& Listen to executives at Twitter and Facebook talk about how we watch television and you might walk away thinking that Americans are chattering nonstop on the social networks while watching their favorite shows. The reality is that most of us don’t tweet or post at all while we’re plopped in front of the tube. When we do, half the time we’re talking about something other than TV. And social media conversation is far weaker than traditional factors, like TV commercials for new shows or our sheer laziness in changing channels, in prompting us to tune into each season’s new offerings. Those are among the crucial findings of a new study released Thursday by the Council for Research

New study finds that broadcast content is the dominant television resource for local political information.  More than half of all respondents (61%) source their local political conversations from something they saw or heard on local news programming alone. Furthermore, broadcast television websites accounted for 4 of the top 5 online influencers, outpacing social media sources by a ratio of 3:1. In fact, if you’re relying on social media to monitor “the local political conversation”, you’re only capturing about 4% of the electorate’s sentiment. To determine the currency value of local news, TVB (the not-for-profit trade association of America’s commercial broadcast television industry) worked with The Keller Fay Group, a full service marketing research and consulting company dedicated exclusively to word-of-mouth marketing. Television has always been a mass medium, allowing candidates to

David Poltrack, Chief Research Officer at CBS, says that Facebook has significantly better Social TV data than Twitter and Nielsen, and Social TV and second screens open up billions of dollars in new revenue opportunities for broadcasters. Article on Futurescape.tv, Dec. 19, 2013 Speaking at the UBS 41st Annual Global Media and Communications Conference, he said: Facebook is developing its own Social TV metric, with encouragement from CBS It already provides better Social TV data than the Nielsen Twitter TV Ratings from Nielsen’s SocialGuide division Social TV and second screen initiatives can enable CBS and other US broadcasters to tap $88 billion of potential new revenue Why Facebook’s Social TV data is better than Twitter’s Poltrack revealed that Facebook is working on its own Social TV metric, with input from

Executive Breakfast: Talk is cheap but Word of Mouth is Priceless! When:   Tuesday, November 12, 8:30am until 10:30am Where:  Turner Broadcasting, 1050 Techwood Drive, Northwest Atlanta, GA 30318 As part of our series of executive briefings, join us to get an insider’s look into the power of authentic experiences and real relationships in today’s Digital Marketplace, as well as brand-new research findings on Social TV. You’ll hear from three thought leaders in the new social-marketing revolution: Ed Keller, CEO of the Keller Fay Group, Peter Storck, industry pioneer and SVP/Research at House Party and Dr. Jack Wakshlag, Chief Research Officer for Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. (TBS, Inc.). Find out more at http://breakfastinatlanta.eventbrite.com/

Brand Chatter in Charlotte

Wednesday, 06 November 2013 by

Charlotte, NC –  The south may be more talkative than other places around the country but some of its cities are more so than others. As seen in the following video news clip, the newscasters at WCCB-TV Charlotte were downright chatty discussing how Charlotte compared to other cities and why their area might be talking less than average about brand preferences than people in other cities. That’s the finding of a study by the Keller Fay Group, consumer conversation experts. The company’s COO Brad Fay was interviewed in the following WCCB segment about his research which found that the average person has about 79 brand related conversations per week in most cities.  Charlotteans only have about 72 such conversations – less than both Atlanta and Raleigh.  It’s something marketers and advertisers

How well does WOM about TV shows align with ratings?  The latest tracking from Keller Fay for Ad Age says, “Quite well.”  People talked the most about the shows they watched the most … for the most part.  So what do you think?  Does water cooler talk predict the hit series?  See the results and story on Ad Age: http://bit.ly/Hw5dL2

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